Buckaringa Sanctuary closure due to feral animal control, Friday 29th September to Monday 2nd October 2017

Buckaringa Sanctuary, managed by the Australian Wildlife Conservancy

The Heysen Trail passes through Buckaringa Sanctuary

The Buckaringa Sanctuary will be temporarily closed at the end of this month. As the Heysen Trail passes through the sanctuary, walkers need to consider the closure if planning to walk in the area.

The next planned closure is:

  • Friday 29 September  to Monday 2 October 2017.

The closure is because the Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) will be undertaking feral animal control in the sanctuary. The sanctuary is home to many Yellow-footed Rock-wallabies.

The sanctuary is located between Quorn and Hawker  You can find it on map 6, chapter 4, of the Heysen Trail Northern Guidebook and on Sheet Map 7b – Dutchmans Stern Conservation Park to Mernmerna Creek.

AWC will place closure signs at all entry points to the sanctuary to warn walkers of the danger .

Heysen Trail reroute around Sampson Flat fireground removed.

Heysen Trail near the Sampson Flat fireground

Heysen Trail route restored near Chain of Ponds and Kersbrook

The temporary reroute of the Heysen Trail due to the Sampson Flat fireground has finally been removed. The last section of the trail through the Mt Crawford Forest near Chain of Ponds and Kersbrook has now been restored.

The devastating fire in the January 2015 resulted in a substantial reroute of the trail. Following work by Forestry SA to clear areas of the forest, the trail has been progressively returned to the original route.

However, until this week the reroute included an extended road walk along South Para Rd near Chain of Ponds and Kersbrook.

The restoration of the trail also includes a small realignment at Chain of Ponds. The trail has been improved and re-routed where it crosses North East Road.

The minor reroute can be viewed:

 

Proposed Upgrade of South Coast Heysen Trail – Feedback Sought

Feedback sought on Heysen Trail South Coast Proposed UpgradeA proposal is under consideration to upgrade the Heysen Trail on the southern Fluerieu Peninsula (67km / 5 days), which will encourage walkers to visit the area, in particular tourists from outside the region.

Feedback is being sought from the public, walkers and potential tourism and adventure operators. The survey will take approx 10 minuntes to complete, or 22 minutes if reading the additional supporting proposal.

About the Upgrade Proposal

Various combinations of walk options will allow for day walkers, 1-2 day walkers, 5-day walkers and a 1-day Accessible trail, with walkers camping on the trail or staying in accommodation nearby. Tourism operators will be able to offer transport services, either daily or the start and end of multi-day walks.

At the core of the product will be a through walk commencing from Cape Jervis and providing access to four exclusive camping sites at Eagle Waterhole, Tapanappa, Balquhidder and Newland Head. These sites will include camping platforms, shelter, toilets and water tanks. Through walkers can tailor their walk, exiting the trail after any of the day walk stages. Tourism operators will add value through the provision of transport, accommodation and other services to day and multi-day walkers.

To provide a ‘softer’ recreational experience for day visitors to the region, or those passing through on their way to Kangaroo Island, and perhaps to encourage new walkers to the region and park, it is proposed that an extensive re-development of the Heysen Trail between Cape Jervis and Fishery Beach (4km one-way, 8km return) will be undertaken to provide a Class 1 trail with boardwalk, viewing platforms and interpretation that will provide an Accessible trail for prams and those with mobility aids including wheelchairs. A boardwalk will be constructed with viewing platforms at points of significant interest in association with appropriate interpretation.

An extension of this upgraded trail onwards to Blowhole Beach (11km walk from Cape Jervis) as a Class 2 trail which will cater for all-terrain wheelchairs, which will be available for hire from the Sealink terminal for visitors with significant physical disabilities. This section will again be suitable for recreational walkers as a two-way linear walk from Cape Jervis or a one way walk with a pick up at the Cobbler Hill camp ground, which will be upgraded to allow cars and buses to park safety.

The proposal is an initiative of the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) and the District Council of Yankalilla, and supports tourism and nature based recreation in regional South Australia.

Provide feedback about this proposal at deepcreek.questionpro.com.

Changes to walk booking arrangements – Golden Boots and Multiwalk Cards

We have recently made changes to our walk booking arrangements. The major change was to discontinue the sale of Multiwalk passes.

Council recently approved changes to walk booking arrangements to simplify our website redevelopment project. In addition to the discontinuation of multiwalk passes Golden Boots passes can now be used on Twilight walks.

When registering for walk, walkers now have the choice of  using:

  • the casual walk fee option of $8 per walk or
  • a Golden Boots pass (unlimited walks over 12 months at a cost of $60).

The concessional rate of $1 per walk for walkers under the age of 18 years will remain in place.

We have advised existing Multiwalk passholders of transitional arrangements available to them until the time that their Multiwalk pass would have expired.

We trust you will appreciate the exceptional value available through the purchase of a Golden Boots pass and the convenience of having to pay only once a year for the cost of your walks.

If you have any questions about these changes or problems registering for your next walk, please contact the Office.

Temporary Re-Route around Giles Conservation Park – until 9 July 2017

Heysen Trail Mapsheet 2B, Temporary ReRoute around Giles CPDue to repairs resulting from damage caused by the September 2016 floods, the Heysen and Yurebilla trails in Giles Conservation Park will be closed from Tuesday June 27th until Sunday July 9th 2017.

A temporary re-route will be marked shortly, but is also shown on the map below. Walkers can avoid the closed trail by following Ridge Road and Woods Hill Road.

The affected section of the Heysen Trail appears on Mapsheet 2B, Bridgewater Oval to Stone Hut Road.

Response from the Friends of the Heysen Trail about the Proposed Bundaleer and Wirrabara Greenways

Southern Flinders Ranges from New Campbell HillThe ownership and management of the Bundaleer and Wirrabara Forests may soon change, following the Mid North Forests Future Strategy which commenced after the devastating bushfires of 2013 and 2014.

The State Government is proposing to use the Recreational Greenways Act 2000 to protect the Heysen and Mawson Trail networks for recreational access in perpetuity for use by walkers and/or cyclists. This will create a greenway over sections of the Heysen and Mawson Trails within Wirrabara and Bundaleer Forests that are proposed to be sold to private parties.

We have some concerns with regard to the proposed changes, which we have outlined in our submission below. Our main concerns relate to the proposed change to the route in Bundaleer that removes the section walked from Curnow’s Hut to New Campbell Hill and consequently removes the extensive views across the Spencer Gulf as well as extending the distance.

Submit your feedback via yoursay.sa.gov.au/greenways by COB Monday 12 June 2017.

Our first End to End Maintenance program weekend

Adrian Rogers, one of the team of Maintenance volunteers, replacing a marker plate in the Deep Creek Conservation Park

The Friends new End to End Maintenance program commenced on the Mother’s Day weekend with a two day camp based at Cape Jervis.  Twelve volunteers plus the section leader Albert Schmidke and his colleague, Richard Triggs worked on the Trail between Cape Jervis and Tapanappa in Deep Creek Conservation Park.

The weather was perfect for maintenance work although the chill breeze later in the afternoon was piercing.  As a result we had two full days of hard work maintaining the trail.  There was plenty of pruning, plating and posting – large amounts of undergrowth needed to be cut back, many old plates had faded and needed to be replaced and several new marker posts were erected to help walkers on their way.

As a result, the first two sections on the trail are in good order and ready for the onslaught from End to End 12 this coming weekend.

Working through two End to End sections in the one weekend proved to be a considerable challenge.  While the team coped very well and the majority of the planned maintenance work was completed, some sections were a little light on as far as pruning is concerned.

The team celebrated on the Saturday night with a very pleasant dinner in the Cape Jervis Tavern.  Seven local guests attended the dinner in an effort to build relationships with local communities.  Their responses were very positive which suggests that this initiative may assist us to enhance the reputation of the Trail and generate positive local interest.

Overall the feedback from all of the volunteers and our dinner guests has been very positive. We have received several constructive suggestions about how we can improve arrangements for our maintenance next camp to be held on June 17 and 18..

For that trip we will be moving along the trail from Tapanappa to Waitpinga. If you are interested in joining the maintenance group for that weekend, you can check the details and register via the Walk Calendar on our website.

For more information on the End to End Maintenance can be found in this bulletin

It’s Volunteer Week — huge thanks to everyone that volunteers within the Friends of the Heysen Trail.

End to End 5 group plant 600 trees at Duttons Trough

It’s commonly known that volunteers are the lifeblood of many community organisations.   I’ve rapidly come to appreciate the broad scope of activities essential to getting people out walking on the Heysen Trail.

So thank you to all our volunteers for your tireless efforts helping to develop, maintain and promote this wonderful trail – no mean feat when you consider it’s 1200km … not just a walk in the park.

There are many different ways that volunteers contribute to the Friends of the Heysen Trail:

  • Monday to Friday the office is buzzing with enthusiasm – most importantly answering phone and walk-in inquiries, assisting with walk registrations, keeping the correspondence up to date and a myriad of administrative activites;
  • Walking – every single weekend dozens of leaders are taking new and not-so-new members out and about on End-Ends, day and introductory short walks.  It takes a lot of hidden preparatory work and energy doing pre-walks, checking trail status, coordinating transport, keeping a group informed and then merrily navigating the correct track;
  • Maintenance – none of us would be walking so easily if the quiet achievers delivering the trail development & maintenance didn’t exist: on your next walk give a little thought to the section leaders and teams that ensure the markers are in place, vegetation is cleared etc. Remember, if you do see an issue along your track, to take a photo/location/details and pass it on to your walk leader or the office;
  • Greening – not all the trees spring up of their own accord, but rather another busy team has planted, watered and nurtured hundreds of trees along parts of the Heysen Trail which boosts the environment and amenity for the rest of us;
  • The Trailwalker Magazine keeps our members informed but also acts as signature promotion for the Heysen and to encourage members to keep walking and contributing;
  • Marketing and promotion is also a challenging task carried out by several volunteers, including our prolific facebook/social media and website material – not to underestimate the important benefit of our on-line facility – the Friends have a website that is truly the envy of other organisations;
  • Finances – where would be without the number-focused people who ensure that the dollars add up so that the Friends meet its requirements for record-keeping and auditing.

The list is not exhaustive and there always seems to be people ready to step in when needed such as the recent Hiking Expo – staffing the stall, handing out material, leading the come-and-try walks and clean up.

Thanks to everyone who volunteers their time in whatever capacity – it all makes a difference.

Melanie Sjoberg

President

Paid help is needed! Will you be in the Flinders Ranges on May 6 & 7?

Paid help is needed! If you will be near the Flinders Ranges next weekend, Ben Hockings (Yumigo) one of our trail supporters has asked for your help.

Ben is organising the Hubert 100, a long distance running event in the Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park on Sat May 6 and Sunday May 7. He needs paid helpers to assist with the event.

Ben needs marshalls to attend water stations/checkpoints at four locations during the event. He suggests 1 or 2 people attend each check point and is offering up to $300 in travel and accommodation allowances per team.

A first aid officer will also be in attendance at each check point.

The check points locations and attendance times will be:

  • 2.00pm Saturday to 8.30am Sunday
    Aroona Ruins
  • 12.30pm Saturday to midnight
    Trezona Campground
  • 6.00pm to 9.30am Sunday morning
    Intersection of Brachina Gorge Road and Bunyeroo Road
  • 8.00pm to 7.00am Sunday morning
    Intersection of Wilcolo Track and Heysen Trail

In association with Yumigo, Ben has organised running events on the Heysen Trail (you may have heard of the Heysen 105) and many other locations across South Australia.

As a result he has become a strong supporter and promoter of the Heysen Trail. If you can assist him, please contact Yumigo.

More trees on the Heysen Trail – thank you to our volunteers.

 

Thank you to the many volunteers who have helped plant trees on the Heysen Trail. The efforts of the Greening Committee and volunteers since 2013 are visible in a number of locations along the trail.

As an example of their work, the trees planted at Worlds End a few years ago can now actually be seen along the road at Duttons Trough (south of Burra).

Most of the trees are still only about knee high but they are starting to stand out from the other roadside vegetation.  The best of the trees is scarcely large enough to hide behind (although the photo shows Neil is having a good try!). It has almost doubled in size over the last twelve months.

Our tallest tree, the Worlds End Wonder, is 1.75m and has shot up recently.

The good rains we’ve had over the last 12 months have helped, but the trees have also benefited from special care and supplemental watering provided by the Greening Committee.

In addition to Duttons Trough, the Greening Committee has also managed plantings at Centennial Drive in the Mount Crawford Forest, Hiskeys Hut and along the Bundaleer Channel reserve south of  Spalding.

This year we are planting at Lights Pass on the Lavender Federation Trail.

Thanks again to the Greening volunteers and End to End walkers who have helped. Your efforts will be appreciated by walkers in the years ahead.