Access to off-track walking may be under threat in the Flinders Ranges and beyond – Pastoral Act Review

Maybe a slightly alarmist subject line, but possibly the case. Walkers ability to access pastoral leases may change, with changes to the way pastoral leaseholders are allowed to manage the land, read on.

The info below has been provided by Walking SA, and is being sent to members of the Friends of the Heysen Trail so they have the information, and can then completed the survey if they have the interest. (many sections of the survey will not be applicable to walkers, so answer “no comment” where applicable). A thorough survey response might take 20-30mins. At the bottom of this email is a table of relevant questions from the survey. The closing date for comments has been extended to 5pm Monday 30 September 2019.

This is of keen interest to FoHT members who undertake extra-circular walks further north, and for any planned FoHT northern trips away. The Friends are with Walking SA in wanting to retain the right to walk through the pastoral country as has been our right since settlement. Sure there will likely be some areas with no, or restricted, access to allow for tourism, cultural sensitivities, or mining activities, yet this should not restrict activity outside those limited, defined areas.

Review of Pastoral Act may impact access for recreational bushwalkers in the Flinders Ranges

What is the issue?

The State Government is seeking input in order to review the Pastoral Act.

Much of the land in the Flinders Ranges north of Hawker is not private freehold land but instead is leased from the State Government to pastoralists to undertake grazing ventures[i], and recognises the rights of Aboriginal people.

As the land is leased, people can undertake recreational off-trail bushwalking in these remote locations. They must notify the lessee of their intentions to walk, and the lessee can only deny access in certain scenarios.

To clarify, by “off-trail bushwalking” we often mean following old vehicle tracks, or walking in a low impact environment, and can include camping for a few nights.

The Act also provides what are called Public Access Routes (PARs), which are often used by 4WDers for recreational use. They will likely probably remain, but our concerns are for access to other lands not part of PARs.

How could changes to Pastoral Act impact on recreational bushwalking? What are our concerns?

The Great North Walk – May 2018.

Directions for the walk in the Lane Cove National Park

The Great North Walk

Bookings for the Friend’s extended walk for 2018 open on February 1st 2018.

The route map.

 Join us as we walk the iconic 250 km trail from Sydney to Newcastle.

The Great North Walk is a wonderful trail following many tracks through a magnificent array of natural and urban environments.

Created in 1988, as an Australian Bicentennial project, the Great North Walk is rich in the history of New South Wales.  Follow the links for more information about the walk.

The Friends will be exploring this long-distance Trail over 17 days in May 2018.

You can find out more about this walk from Peter Solomon using the email link given in the walk description on the Friends walk calendar.

To secure accommodation, bookings need to be made early.  Make sure you don’t miss out on this great walk.

 

Vale Jamie Shephard, past President of Friends of the Heysen Trail

Vale Jamie Sheppard, past President of Friends of the Heysen Trail

Vale Jamie Shephard, past President of Friends of the Heysen Trail

The Friends of the Heysen Trail are saddened by the passing of our highly esteemed past President Jamie Shephard on 27 December, 2016. Jamie was active in all facets of the walking community, and a most generous host of social functions for the members. Jamie will be remembered as a true gentleman and friend to all who knew him, and he will be very sadly missed in the wider community.

Vale Jamie Sheppard, past President of Friends of the Heysen Trail

Adelaide Hills flood damage closes some walking trails.

flood-damage-to-montacute-road14-09-2016

Flood damage to Montacute Road (picture courtesy of ABC News).

The heavy rains that fell in the Adelaide Hills last week have damaged some popular walking trails and restricted access to several parks.

The lower section of the Waterfall Gully to Mount Lofty trail is closed and may take several months to repair. Alternative access points to the Mount Lofty trail can be found here: Cleland Conservation Park – Waterfall Gully.

While some of the damage has already been repaired, the following parks are also currently affected:

Walkers are advised to check the Park closures listing before setting out to walk in parks in the hills.

Montacute Road at Athelstone and Waterfall Gully Road at Burnside remain closed while repair works continue. Waterfall Gully Road is currently restricted to local traffic only, although it is expected to reopen within a few days.

You can check the current road access at Traffic SA road closures.

Vale Honorary Member Jim Crinion

jim-crinion-01

Jim Crinion

The Friends are saddened to report the death of Honorary Member Jim Crinion. Jim joined the Friends at the initial meeting in June 1986. At that meeting Jim was appointed Chairman of the Steering Committee, tasked with setting up the Friends of the Heysen Trail and Other Walking Trails. Once the Friends were established, Jim continued on as Council member and is well known for leading the original Greening Group which did many years of work, especially with plantings around the Kapunda area. These trees have grown are now enjoyed by todays walkers

An enthusiastic walker in Australia and in many other countries, Jim is also remembered for his popular books of walks – “Adelaide and Country Walks”.

Walkers be warned – Bees!

Bees love Canola

Now is the time you need to take caution when walking near flowering crops. We are now at the highest risk of being attacked by bees.

August to October sees canola crops come into full flower providing picturesque bright yellow fields. The flowers attract bees and the installation of commercial bee hives (clusters of white boxes). Bees don’t take kindly to any interference (intentional or not) and can attack en masse.

What you need to do:

  1. To reduce the risk, walkers are strongly advised to avoid walking between the bee hives and neighbouring canola crops in flower.
  2. If your walking trail passes a group of hives, take a wide berth away from them. If possible, stick to made tracks or walk along fencelines.  You should avoid walking through crops when off trail.
  3. If you have experienced reactions to bee stings, you are responsible for carrying appropriate medication. You should also advise your walk leader of any medical condition before you commence your walk.

Walk the Yorke Official Opening 13 December 2015

The Friends of the Heysen Trail were represented at the successful opening to the Walk the Yorke at Port Vincent on Sunday 13 December 2015.

Around 70 walkers checked out four kilometres of the trail from Port Vincent wharf north to the Golf Club. At the Golf Club a large range of stalls and activities were crowded with locals and visitors before the opening by Rowan Ramsay MP at 12pm. There were many ARPA and Friends of the Heysen Trail members attending the walk.

Maps of the trail, including detailed section maps, are on the Visit Yorke Peninsula website.

The planning and construction was driven by the Yorke Peninsula Council Operations Manager, Stephen (Goldy) Goldsworthy. It was Goldy’s concept, and his passion and dedication that has delivered the project. Major funding came from an Australian Government Regional Development grant ($1.3m), plus the Yorke Peninsula Council ($1.3m) and the Government of South Australia ($900,000).

Almost 500km of trail, linking tracks and roads has been marked, trailhead signs are at all towns, plus walker crossing signs on the main roads. Shared Use signs indicate when walkers, bikes and cars are on the same road/track. Signs indicate where bikes and walkers separate. Bench seats installed and shelters with tanks constructed at strategic locations for multi-day treks. The section out of Port Wakefield towards Port Clinton follows the old trail formation. The walking trails vary from many kilometres of well formed gravel paths, to more challenging natural trail and beach walking along the south sections. For bushwalkers there seems to be a lot of road walking for an end to end trek, although the ARPA walkers have completed the full length over the past 3 years. Plenty of sections along the coast for short and day walks, with views of the ocean, along beaches and through coastal bush.

Goldy sees the Walk the Yorke as a work-in-progress, with the Council committed to maintenance, and local interest groups helping to keep the trail maintained. The plan is for upgrades and rerouting to improve the experience, to be done over time.

Checking out Other Sections – Port Clinton to Port Vincent

On Saturday as we checked out sections of the Walk the Yorke from Pt Clinton to Port Vincent.

Walk the Yorke from Port Clinton to Port Vincent (2) Walk the Yorke from Port Clinton to Port Vincent (3) Walk the Yorke from Port Clinton to Port Vincent (4) Walk the Yorke from Port Clinton to Port Vincent

Checking out Other Sections – South from Port Vincent

South from Port Vincent, Walk the Yorke Trail (2) South from Port Vincent, Walk the Yorke Trail (3) South from Port Vincent, Walk the Yorke Trail (4) South from Port Vincent, Walk the Yorke Trail

Seats made from recycled plastic, example at Port Julia. There are 40 of these seats that Stephen designed, and are installed along the walk. A lot of the posts and infrastructure utilises recycled plastic. Steel flexible posts, in yellow, are used as standard marker posts. Brown recycled plastic posts are also used for marker posts.

This Sunday 8th November – Morialta Centenary Picnic. 2 x Walks. Bid on Historic Images Auction

Morialta Centenary Picnic Sunday 8th November. 2 x Walks. Bid on Historic Images AuctionJoin in the community events to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Morialta Conservation Park.

Free walks for the public to check out the Morialta Conservation Park.

  • 8:00am – 10:45am Friends of Heysen Trail guided walk into the higher areas of the park and back.
  • 9:00am – 10:45am Friends of Heysen Trail guided walk up around the top of First Falls, Second Falls and back.
  • Both walks are due back for the official program starting at 11am. 20 person limit to each walk.

11:00am Welcome to Country by Kaurna Elder Lewis O’Brien.

View all the day’s activities, including free face painting, slacklining, Bugs N Slugs, Violets, Ranger Talk.

Supported by us, the Friends of the Heysen Trail, Friends of Black Hill & Morialta and Natural Resources Adelaide and Mount Lofty.

Bushwalk.com eMag Featuring South Australia’s Best Walks

Bushwalk.com eMag October edition cover - Best South Australian Walks featuring Friends of the Heysen Trail

The October edition of Bushwalk.com eMag is out – with a focus the best walks in South Australia. The articles include a profile on the Friends of the Heysen Trail.

Other SA articles include:

Other articles include:

Deep Creek Family Fun Day – 20 September 2015

Deep Creek Family Fun Day - 20 September 2015Head to South Australia’s most scenic bushland reserve for a free family open day at Deep Creek Conservation Park.

  • Gourmet food and wine stalls
  • Enjoy kids’ face painting and games
  • Meet baby animals from the Native Animal Network
  • Meet animals including koalas from Urimbirra Wildlife Park
  • Learn about macro invertebrates with kids’ Water Watch activities

Drop in and say hi at our stall!